Into Aether (The Trinity Key Trilogy) by L.M. Fry

Into Aether Book Cover Into Aether
The Trinity Key
L.M. Fry
Young Adult Science Fiction
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
March 26, 2016
Kindle E-book
340

Colorado teen Theodora (Theo) will do anything to find her missing mom, including travel into the hidden and mysterious Victorian subculture of Aether. She takes a ride with airship pirates to a floating island full of strange automatons and even stranger people. After a century-old feud reignites, she uncovers the alarming truth about her family's past. Finding her mother is more important than ever.

free copyInto Aether…Into a New World

The concept for Into Aether, book one in the Trinity Key Trilogy, was interesting and full of promise. It is a blend of Celtic mythology (Danu and her daughters), advanced science fiction (automatons, flying ships, aether, and physics), and your typical punk kid heroine who falls for the dashing insider from her new world. And, in many ways the book delivered, but in some ways it fell flat, so much so that I almost chose not to finish it. However, I slogged ahead, and noted that when my Kindle hit 53% the story suddenly picked up, and from there it didn’t stop until coming to an abrupt conclusion that piqued my interest enough that I am sure to read the next two volumes in the series.

Into Aether is centered around the steampunk subculture in science fiction. L.M. Fry has created a fantastic world, with vivid imagery. I enjoyed her descriptions of things and people, because I had such a brilliant picture of everything in my head. The downside of this is the aforementioned slow start, because it takes more than half the book to set up the story and the world in which it takes place, before you can get to any action! Once the action starts, though, the rest of the book is a thrilling ride, with several plot twists. This is not to say that you won’t see the grand finale coming, but it is still a fun, nail biting journey towards the conclusion of the book.

Into Aether would be an enjoyable book for  high school students interested in steampunk, or just science fiction in general. The romance is quite chaste, and sweet, with nothing to make parents raise an eyebrow. There is just enough teenage angst and rebellion to make the characters relatable to younger readers, and to give older readers something to roll their eyes over. All in all, this is a fun little weekend book, you just have to be patient enough to make it to the good stuff!

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